Internet Affects Students Concentration: New Study Finds Students Need Website Blocker For Studying

Posted By Mike Rollins 15 Apr 2015

website blocker for studying

 

An annual survey of student Internet habits has found that 68% of US students have suffered significant procrastination because of online distractions.

The survey of 2000 college students in the US undertaken by

Stop Procrastinating, the research productivity website, found students were worried by the constant distraction from the Internet through social media and websites, such as YouTube and many others, were reducing their ability to concentrate for long periods of time.

Worrying level of distraction

68% of respondents claimed the level at which the Internet distracted them from study was significant and worrying. However, first year students said they suffered the worst levels of distractions with some 78% saying they were worried or very worried by the level of distraction the Internet caused.

How The Internet Distracts Students

 

Of all respondents 58% said they had tried to concentrate on writing an essay for more than a week only to be distracted at some point by the Internet.

62% said they had lost their chain of thought because they checked and responded to an email or social media alert while they were trying to study.

Some 48% said visiting distracting websites or social media cost them at least an hour a day in lost productivity or study.

42% said they were worried that the quality of their work was being affected by rushing work due to procrastination caused by the Internet. They believe that distraction caused by the Internet had caused them to hand in lower quality work which was reflect in a reduction in their grades.

Internet more distracting than distractions in the past.

61% of students realised that procrastination was a problem for students in the past, but believed that the Internet was more invasive then anything students had to cope with before. The respondents said it could directly distract students while they were working, ie the Internet existed on the computer on which they wrote or worked so it was much easier to be distracted by it.

The survey found that only 12% said they had been distracted by the television, some claiming that because it was in a different room to where they studied it didn’t distracted them.

15% said a hangover had distracted from study.

Impulse control

44% of respondents claimed the Internet and social media was pernicious as it directly affected their impulse control. Unlike the TV which is passive, the Internet, email and social media required attention, which could lead to hours being lost.

44% said they were worried that the quality of their work was being affected by rushing work due to procrastination caused by the internet. They believe that distraction caused by the internet had caused them to hand in lower quality work which was reflect in a reduction in their grades.

79% of students realised that procrastination was a problem for students in the past, but believed that the internet was more invasive then anything students had to cope with before. The respondents said it could directly distract students while they were working, ie the internet existed on the computer on which they wrote or worked so it was much easier to be distracted by it.

The survey found that only 14% said they had been distracted by the television, some claiming that because it was in a different room to where they studied it didn’t distracted them. 15% said a hangover had distracted from study.